Asking teachers for help

By Mia Gold-Rosenberg, LMSW A new school year means a new classroom, new teachers, and new friends. Getting into the routine of a new school year can be intimidating, causing kids to feel anxious and become fearful to ask for help. When kids are afraid to ask for help, they can start to fall behind

Inclusive and Kind

Here we are at the end of August. Summer vacation is winding down and the kids are getting ready to go back to school. For some, this is a time of excitement. Getting to see old friends, starting a new adventure in an older grade, and getting ready to take new classes. But for some

Cool Kids

Remember that time, at school, when all the cool kids were sitting together? Talking and laughing? When you desperately wanted to join in, but were left out of the fun? Remember how painful it was? Maybe something similar is happening to your child right now. Maybe something like that is happening to you? Here are

Five Tips To Turn Your Child’s I Can’t into I Can

By Mia Gold-Rosenberg, LMSW   Every day children face obstacles that make them feel that no matter what they just cannot do it. They can’t get up in the morning. They can’t do their homework. They can’t exercise. They can’t eat healthy. They can’t engage in the lesson during class. They just can’t. All of these

Summertime teenagers

Summertime is for relaxing. But, for many teenagers, relaxing seems to mean sitting on the couch and staring into screens. Games, social media, catching up with celebrity news – all of that can easily fill up a teenager’s vacation day, and all of it can be done without moving any muscles except for fingers and eyes.

In a busy, and sometimes stressful, life we all need positive coping strategies like taking a walk in nature, scheduling breaks, listening to music, taking a deep breath, practicing mindfulness meditation, engaging creativity, talking to a good friend, or taking a bath. But which strategy is right for which kind of situation? How effective is it

Homework Help: Make Homework Time More Efficient

Your child spends about seven hours a day in school. When he finally gets to go home he finds a pile of homework waiting for him, usually enough to keep him occupied for a few more hours. If he has after-school activities, he may not even have the chance to go home to work on

Cooking Up Social Skills Fall 2015

Thursday, 20 August 2015 by
Social Skills

I am  happy to announce that Cooking Up Social Skills will begin its Fall Session on Monday, October 19th.   Cooking Up Social Skills is a fun 8-week group that meets on Monday afternoons in Gramercy Park/ Flatiron District for elementary school students. Each week we pair a classic therapeutic social skill activity with a creative

Check out what we have been up to in Cooking Up Social Skills this winter! Transitioning back to school after a long break can be challenging. Children were encouraged to talk about difficulties that were presented socially, academically, and emotionally during those first few days of school. For our therapy activity, children listened attentively as we

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Cooking Up Social Skills Flyer

Announcing the Winter 2015 session of Cooking Up Social Skills! Cooking Up Social Skills is an 8-week group for elementary-aged children. This group incorporates therapeutic programming and creative food based activities to teach essential social skills. Topics will include: Emotion management, sharing, turn-taking, listening, mindfulness, flexible transitions, self-confidence, and relationship building. Each topic will be

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